theremin

Imagine when electricity was first used to make music (some say the sound was like an electronic musical saw). Invented by an extraordinary Russian inventor, LeonTheremin, and introduced to New York audiences in the 1920’s, the theremin is one of the great musical stories of the 20th Century.

  listen: wav  mp3

 

 

flower pots

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the earthy timbre of clay

 

 

musical saw

made popular in music halls and on Vaudeville in the early 1900’s, the sound almost disappeared with the popularity of electronic music. Today, thanks in part to folk musicians like the late Thomas Jefferson Scribner, the instrument is experiencing a rennaisance. Scribner described the forgotten musical saw as “The Lost Sound”.
  listen: wav  mp3

 

 

blown bottles

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finely tuned with water and blown across the opening, the breathy sound is reminiscent of the calliope from yesterday.

 

 

turkey baster

the flute of the kitchen.
  listen: wav  mp3

 

 

conch shell

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one of the oldest sounds on the planet...the elemental cry of the shell has been heard for thousands of years.

 

 

vacuum cleaner hose

singing into one end while twirling the hose in the air transforms the voice into a doppler choir.
  listen: wav  mp3

 

 

wind wands

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vibrating elastic bands swinging through the air...this wood and elastic band instrument invented by Carla, inspires her movement in performance. another musical inventor in California, Darell Devore, makes similar sound devices and named them "wind wands."

 

 

wooden bowls

finally a good use for those wooden salad bowls that everyone once received as presents from a well-intentioned aunt. Floating in water and struck with a super ball impaled on a knitting needle the salad bowl transforms into an elemental drum.
  listen: wav  mp3

 

 

waterphone

  listen: wav  mp3 
stainless steel and bronze and water combine to give the evocative sounds and echoes. Imagine the joy of playing a duet with whales. Thanks to Richard Waters, the inventor.